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The picture on the right Performance Built Log Splitter
Posted On 06/05/17 @ 10:07 PM by usefulsplitt

Left: Mushrooms have incredible Performance Built Log Splitter as a future food source and can absorb toxins from the soil, says Wist. Right: Carob agar-agar pudding with whipped cream. Carob is substituted for chocolate, as cocoa production is threatened by rising temperatures. The picture on the right above, depicting a pudding made with carob and an algae-derived gelatin called agar-agar, is one of Wist's favorites. It forces viewers to "acknowledge that chocolate's being replaced," she says. It's a reality cocoa farmers in West Africa are already facing. "

 West Africa is thought to rise by about two degrees in the next 100 years," says Wist. "It will be too hot, too dry for cocoa production." And carob, which is less vulnerable to climate change, may be a good substitute. Another major ingredient in these recipes is seaweed. has suggested that seaweed farming could be a good source of nutrition, as well as help mitigate climate change. "Seaweed can absorb five times as much CO2 as land plants," says Wist. "I was really inspired by that research and thought what if someone did that?


What if we started farming this more earnestly?" Kombu, kelp, oysters, clams and other mollusks. If we farm seaweeds like kelp and kombu and protect bivalves, they could become a reliable source of food in the future, especially for coastal communities, says Wist. "Part of this [essay] is dystopic," says Wist. "Because we're losing all these things, and that's bad." But part of it is utopic, too, she says, because it shows how human creativity can help us find alternative sources of food.
You can see Wist's entire essay and some creative recipes for the dishes above . Rhitu Chatterjee is an editor with @NPRFood. You can follow her .

Analyzing The Language Of Suicide Notes To Help Save Lives About a third of people who attempt suicide leave a note. John Pestian and others at Cincinnati Children's Hospital are merging psychology and computer analysis to see if such notes can help diagnose suicidal tendencies in the living. NEAL CONAN, HOST: Every 14 minutes, someone in this country commits suicide, and research on ways to reduce that grim statistic appears to be on a plateau. In other words, psychologists don't have much in the way of new ideas - at least, right now - except maybe for what's described as groundbreaking work on the notes that those who kill themselves sometimes leave behind.

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